Pullahari Monastery of Kathmandu

Pullhari Monastery is one of the tourist destinations in Kathmandu. Located atop the hill, just outside Boudha, Pullahari is easily accessible through private vehicle and taxi. It remains open throughout the year, and both locals and tourists can visit the place.


Overview

Pullahari is a Buddhist monastery located in Kapan region of Kathmandu. The popular Kapan monastery lies near to Pullahari. It is the main seat of His Eminence the fourth Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche, Lodro Chokyi Nyima.

In 1986, the Venerable Dabzang Rinpoche offered land to the third Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche and requested him to build a three-year retreat centre for monks of the Karma Kagyu lineage, thus, Pullahari came into existence.

History

Accepting the offer, the third Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche began the construction of the monastery in 1987. He named the place “Pullahari,” after Naropa’s monastery in Bihar, India where Lotsawa Marpa lived and practiced for many years. It was also there that Naropa learned about Marpa’s student, Milarepa, and prophesied the future of the Lineage.

Tibetan Buddhist Architecture
Tibetan Buddhist Architecture

The building was completed in February 1992 and was blessed by the third Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche. On April 26, 1992, the Third Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche dissolved his mind in parinirvana. However, he had left behind his instructions and wishes to his devoted monks and disciples along with the wealth of his legacy.

The Third Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche also requested the Venerable Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche to guide the 3-year Mahamudra retreat centre and the programs at the Rigpe Dorje Institute which he wanted to be established in Pullahari.

PRAYER OF PULLAHARI
In Pullahari, with its good clean earth,
Its water so sparkling clean and its clean fresh air;
Here in the solitude of this secluded place,
With its spacious scenery and relaxing view;
To listen and reflect on the Teachings here
In Pullahari, what a Lucky Star!

Nature Preservation

The administration of the monastery keep an acute eye on the preservation of the local environment. Noplastic bags are allowed inside the premises. Only bio-degradable stuffs are used and local forest is well monitored and maintained.

Their major preservation agendas are;

  • To serve as fencing where it is appropriate.
  • To prevent soil erosion and landslides.
  • For food – vegetables, fruits, teas and herbs.
  • For shade and beautification of the environment.

Contact Outdoor Experts

Jokhang Temple: The Religious Landmark of Lhasa

Jokhang Temple is the most important and revered religious site in the entire Lhasa. A 1,300 years old monastery is dedicated to the Buddhists throughout the world.


Overview

Jokhang temple, also known as Qoikang Monastery or Zuglagkang, is the most revered religious site throughout Lhasa. It means “House of the Lords” in Tibetan, and is located at the center of the popular Barkhar market. It was founded by the King Songtsan Gampo in 647, the first ruler of the unified Tibet, and his two wives who are credited with bringing the Buddhism in Tibet.

Gilt roof of the Jokhang temple
Gilt roof of the Jokhang temple

The two-storeyed Jokhang is best visited in the morning, though the crowds of pilgrims can be thick. Access inside the temple is possible in the afternoon through a side entrance, but only the ground-floor chapels can be viewed (and then only through a grille) when there are no pilgrims.

It’s an important pilgrimage site for all the Tibetans. Most pilgrims arrive on foot often circumambulating around the Barkhar Street.

History

Constructed in the 7th century by the King Songtsan Gampo, it contains a statue of Sakyamuni Buddha that Chinese Princess Wen Cheng brought over 1300 years ago is the most venerated artifact in all of Tibet. The temple, a splendid four-floor building facing west under a guilded rooftop, is on Barkhor Square in the center of the old section of Lhasa.

Since the Chinese occupation in 1951, the temple has taken on a political role as the focus of Tibetan cultural identity and resistance.

During the Cultural Revolution, Red Guards (China) ambushed the Jokhang in 1966 and for a decade there was no worship in Tibetan monasteries. Renovation of the Jokhang began in 1972, and was mostly complete by 1980.


Legend

According to the legend, the temple was built on the lake site. It was profusely chosen because every time a monastery was built in the region, it would collapse. Princess Wen Cheng advised, they must demolish the hag, which was the main reason for crumbling buildings, by filling and leveling the lake using 1,000 goats to carry soil from a mountain far away.

When the construction was completed, the site was called Ra-Sa-Vphrul-Snang (‘ra’ meaning goat and ‘sa’ meaning earth) to commemorate those goats.